Free Cleft Surgery in Bangalore

Free facial deformities and cleft lip palate surgeries for underprivileged children in Bangalore by Trinity Care Foundation Team.

We help children in need of surgery for treatable facial deformities such as cleft lip, cleft palate, tmj ankylosis, facial clefts, hemangioma and vascular malformations. Here’s a video about our journey : https://youtu.be/ycFpXsVCsY8

 

About Trinity Care Foundation;

Trinity Care Foundation is a charitable/not-for-profit Trust with track record of 9+ years in priority areas of health. Registered with the Income Tax Department, Government of India under Section 12A and 80G of the Income Tax Act, 1961. Registered with the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India under Section 11 (1) of the Foreign Contributions (Regulation) Act (FCRA), 2010. It is also registered with the National Health Mission and NITI Aayog [ The National Institution for Transforming India, is the premier policy ‘Think Tank’ of the Government of India.]

Join with us : https://www.instagram.com/trinitycarefoundation

Contact us for implementing CSR healthcare initiatives. Impact : https://www.flickr.com/photos/trinitycarefoundation/albums

email: support@trinitycarefoundation.org | tel: +91 9880396666 | +91 9880358888

web: http://www.trinitycarefoundation.com : http://trinitycarefoundation.org

Advertisements

CSR Initiatives in Bangalore

Healthcare CSR activities in Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Companies are proactively taking up this good hearted investment and giving a social value to all their business endeavors. http://www.trinitycarefoundation.com/csr/ 

Health Camp - Child Specialist

TCF [ Trinity Care Foundation ] is making a call to you to partner, invest in and contribute to this critical constituent of India’s health, development and future well-being.

  1. Activities implemented by Trinity Care Foundation with track record of 9+ years in priority areas of health.
  2. Contributions to TCF eligible for inclusion under CSR spend as per the Companies Act AND eligible for 50% deduction under section 80G of the Income Tax Act.
  3. Registered with the Ministry of Home Affairs under Section 11 (1) of the Foreign Contributions (Regulation) Act (FCRA), 2010. It is also registered with the National Health Mission and NITI Aayog.

‘Preventive healthcare’ is an area identified under schedule VII of the Companies Act 2013 that is eligible to receive CSR funding either directly or through an implementing agency that has a track record.

For CSR partnership,
Write to – support@trinitycarefoundation.org or
Call Dr. Thomas +91 9880396666 or Mr. Binu +91 9880358888

Please visit our link : https://www.flickr.com/photos/trinitycarefoundation/albums related to Social responsibility initiatives focusing on underprivileged children.

Social responsibility initiatives Bangalore

Corporate have Social Responsibility (CSR) goals to help improve community living. In India, though the corporates understand their accountability towards the society and are willing to take initiatives for the betterment, it becomes difficult for them to reach the grassroot level.School Health Program Bangalore

To help meet your corporate social responsibility (CSR) goals, Trinity Care Foundation (TCF) can create specific project proposals for your organisation. Partner organisations could fund surgeries of, say, 30 TCF Kids suffering from Facial Deformities or fund the treatment of, say, 25 TCF kids suffering from cleft lip and cleft palate, Conduct a School Health Program for Students in Government Schools or Conduct an Outreach Health Program in a Backward Area.

 

Such projects will make CSR contribution targeted, making them simple to execute as turnkey CSR projects. ‘Promoting healthcare’ is an area identified under schedule VII of the Companies Act 2013 that is eligible to receive CSR funding either directly or through an implementing agency that has a track record.

Trinity Care Foundation has been actively supporting critical community health for over 9 years, hence meets these requirements. Get in touch now and make Trinity Care Foundation your partner for promoting healthcare.

Please visit our web link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/trinitycarefoundation/albums , For further discussion, please get in touch with Mr. Binu Varghese at binu.varghese@trinitycarefoundation.com | +91 9880 35 8888 .

Trinity Care Foundation is a charitable trust registered under Indian Trusts Act and donations to the organization are exempt under Section 80G of the Income Tax Act. It is also registered with the Ministry of Home Affairs under Section 11 (1) of the Foreign Contributions (Regulation) Act (FCRA), 2010. It is also registered as an NGO with the National Health Mission and NITI Aayog.

Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act (COTPA) 2003 Specified Siganges for Public Information

Prohibition of Smoking in Public Places- Section 4 of Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act 2003(COTPA):

Who can download?

Owner, Perpetrator, Manager, Supervisor or in charge of the affairs of a Public Place is responsible to display this signage.

Where to install the Signage?

• Entrance(on every floor of the public place) of the public place
• All conspicuous places inside
• Staircase and entrance to the lift at each floor
Please note: If anyone in-charge of the public place fails to display such signages they are liable to pay fine (up to Rs. 200) equivalent to the number of individual offences.

Specification of the Board:

1) The board shall be of a minimum size of 60cm by 30cm of white background.
2) It shall contain a circle of not less than 15cm outer diameter with a red perimeter of not less than 3cm wide with the picture, in the center of the cigarette or Bidi with black smoke and crossed by a red band.
3) The width of the red band across the cigarette shall equal width of the red perimeter.
4) The board shall contain the warning “no smoking area-smoking here is an offence “, In English or one Indian language, as applicable.
5) Name, designation and contact number of in charge person should be mention below the signage (minimum size of 60cm by 15 cm of white background).

Click to Download the Section 4 Signage.. 

Outreach Health Program in Billur Primary Health Centre (PHC)

On the 19- November -2014, Trinity Care Foundation conducted a Free Multi-Speciality Health camp in Billur Primary Health Centre (PHC) , Bagepalli Taluk, Chickaballapura District, Karnataka, India for the General Public in and around Billur Village.

Health Camp Inauguration

Trinity Care Foundation worked in conjunction with Bagepalli Taluk Government Health Department officials and Gram Panchayat Members to organize this event . This was Corporate Social Responsibility initiative of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited { HAL }, Bangalore.

Health Workers from villages were directed in advance to inform in their respective villages about the Health camp. In order to spread awareness about the camp, the foundation organized press releases in local newspapers and also put up posters in and around several villages.

Health Camp registeration

 

Health Camp - General Medicine

 

HAL Health Camp

The Specialties Included;

Pediatrics – School Health Programs
Cardiology – ECG & ECHO Scanning
Dentistry – Scaling and Dental Treatments on Mobile Dental Unit
Gynaecology
Diabetology – Random Blood Sugar (RBS)Tests
Ophthalmology – Providing Spectacles and Cataract Surgeries
Dermatology
General Medicine
Maxillofacial Surgery – Facial Deformities – Free Surgeries for Needy { Children and Young Adults } .
Medicines were provided at the Venue..  

HAL Health Camp  - Women's Health

 

Dental Public Health

A team of 15 Doctors , 7 Nurses, 12 Volunteers as well  Officers and Staff  from HAL, Bangalore arrived at  Billur Primary Health Centre (PHC) , the site of the Health Camp at around 10:15 am. Billur Village is 135 Kilometers from Bangalore City towards Devanahalli – Chickkaballapura on Hyderabad Route.

 Trinity Care Foundation distributed Free medicines, conducted RBS Test, ECG & ECHO. A referral for Eye care, Cancer, Cardiac and School Health Program system is in Place.  974 Individuals were examined for various Health Issues.
Health Camp - Child Specialist
HAL Health Camp - Diabetes Care
Corporate Social Responsibility is a management concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and interactions with their stakeholders. CSR is generally understood as being the way through which a company achieves a balance of economic, environmental and social imperatives (“Triple-Bottom-Line- Approach”), while at the same time addressing the expectations of shareholders and stakeholders. In this sense it is important to draw a distinction between CSR, which can be a strategic business management concept, and charity, sponsorship’s or philanthropy. Even though the latter can also make a valuable contribution to poverty reduction, will directly enhance the reputation of a company and strengthen its brand, the concept of CSR clearly goes beyond that.
HAL Health Camp  Pharmacy
If you love to Partner with us for CSR Projects  | Email :-  support@trinitycarefoundation.org |
To learn more :-  Website |  Facebook  |  LinkedIn |  Twitter  | Pinterest | Flickr |

Ebola virus disease

1. What is Ebola virus disease?

Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever) is a severe, often fatal illness, with a death rate of up to 90%. The illness affects humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

Ebola first appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks, one in a village near the Ebola River in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the other in a remote area of Sudan. EBOLA VIRUS

The origin of the virus is unknown but fruit bats (Pteropodidae) are considered the likely host of the Ebola virus, based on available evidence.

2. How do people become infected with the virus?

Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals. In Africa, infection has occurred through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest. It is important to reduce contact with high-risk animals (i.e. fruit bats, monkeys or apes) including not picking up dead animals found lying in the forest or handling their raw meat.

Once a person comes into contact with an animal that has Ebola, it can spread within the community from human to human. Infection occurs from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, or other bodily fluids or secretions (stool, urine, saliva, semen) of infected people. Infection can also occur if broken skin or mucous membranes of a healthy person come into contact with environments that have become contaminated with an Ebola patient’s infectious fluids such as soiled clothing, bed linen, or used needles.

Ebola Virus b

Health workers have frequently been exposed to the virus when caring for Ebola patients. This happens because they are not wearing personal protection equipment, such as gloves, when caring for the patients. Health care providers at all levels of the health system – hospitals, clinics and health posts – should be briefed on the nature of the disease and how it is transmitted, and strictly follow recommended infection control precautions.

Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola. Persons who have died of Ebola must be handled using strong protective clothing and gloves, and be buried immediately.

People are infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. For this reason, infected patients receive close monitoring from medical professionals and receive laboratory tests to ensure the virus is no longer circulating in their systems before they return home. When the medical professionals determine it is okay for the patient to return home, they are no longer infectious and cannot infect anyone else in their communities. Men who have recovered from the illness can still spread the virus to their partner through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery. For this reason, it is important for men to avoid sexual intercourse for at least 7 weeks after recovery or to wear condoms if having sexual intercourse during 7 weeks after recovery.

3. Who is most at risk?

During an outbreak, those at higher risk of infection are:

  • health workers;
  • family members or others in close contact with infected people;
  • mourners who have direct contact with the bodies of the deceased as part of burial ceremonies; and
  • hunters in the rain forest who come into contact with dead animals found lying in the forest.

More research is needed to understand if some groups, such as immuno-compromised people or those with other underlying health conditions, are more susceptible than others to contracting the virus.

Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family

Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family

Exposure to the virus can be controlled through the use of protective measures in clinics and hospitals, at community gatherings, or at home.

Global Alert and Response (GAR)

Epidemic & Pandemic Alert and Response (EPR) – http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/ 

Africa WHO – http://www.afro.who.int/

WHO calls for higher tobacco taxes to save more lives

 On World No Tobacco Day (31 May), WHO calls on countries to raise taxes on tobacco to encourage users to stop and prevent other people from becoming addicted to tobacco. Based on 2012 data, WHO estimates that by increasing tobacco taxes by 50%, all countries would reduce the number of smokers by 49 million within the next 3 years and ultimately save 11 million lives.

Today, every 6 seconds someone dies from tobacco use. Tobacco kills up to half of its users. It also incurs considerable costs for families, businesses and governments. Treating tobacco-related diseases like cancer and heart disease is expensive. And as tobacco-related disease and death often strikes people in the prime of their working lives, productivity and incomes fall.

“Raising taxes on tobacco is the most effective way to reduce use and save lives,” says WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan. “Determined action on tobacco tax policy hits the industry where it hurts.”

The young and poor people benefit most

Image

High prices are particularly effective in discouraging young people (who often have more limited incomes than older adults) from taking up smoking. They also encourage existing young smokers to either reduce their use of tobacco or quit altogether.

“Price increases are 2 to 3 times more effective in reducing tobacco use among young people than among older adults,” says Dr Douglas Bettcher, Director of the Department for Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases at WHO. “Tax policy can be divisive, but this is the tax rise everyone can support. As tobacco taxes go up, death and disease go down.”

Good for economies too

WHO calculates that if all countries increased tobacco taxes by 50% per pack, governments would earn an extra US$ 101 billion in global revenue.

“These additional funds could – and should – be used to advance health and other social programmes,” adds Dr Bettcher.

Countries such as France and the Philippines have already seen the benefits of imposing high taxes on tobacco. Between the early 1990s and 2005, France tripled its inflation-adjusted cigarette prices. This was followed by sales falling by more than 50%. A few years later the number of young men dying from lung cancer in France started to go down. In the Philippines, one year after increasing taxes, the Government has collected more than the expected revenue and plans to spend 85% of this on health services.

Tobacco taxes are a core element of tobacco control

Tobacco use is the world’s leading preventable cause of death. Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year, of which more than 600 000 are non-smokers dying from breathing second-hand smoke. If no action is taken, tobacco will kill more than 8 million people every year by 2030, more than 80% of them among people living in low- and middle-income countries.

Raising taxes on tobacco in support of the reduction of tobacco consumption is a core element of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), an international treaty that entered into force in 2005 and has been endorsed by 178 Parties. Article 6 of the WHO FCTC, Price and Tax Measures to Reduce the Demand for Tobacco, recognizes that “price and tax measures are an effective and important means of reducing tobacco consumption by various segments of the population, in particular young persons”.

Editor’s note

In September 2011, world leaders adopted a UN Political Declaration on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) at the United Nations General Assembly and committed themselves to accelerate implementation of the WHO FCTC. WHO was requested to complete a number of global assignments that would accelerate national efforts to address NCDs.

Since then a global agenda has been set, based on 9 concrete global NCD targets for 2025 organized around the WHO Global action plan for the prevention and control of NCDs 2013-2020. The plan comprises a set of actions which, when performed collectively by Member States, UN agencies and WHO, will help to achieve a global target of a 25% reduction in premature mortality from NCDs by 2025 and a 30% reduction in the prevalence of tobacco use. The WHO Global action plan indicates that the reduction of affordability of tobacco products by increasing tobacco taxes is a very cost-effective and affordable intervention for all Member States.

The United Nations will hold a comprehensive review on the prevention and control of NCDs 10-11 July 2014 in New York. The review will provide a timely opportunity for rallying political support for the acceleration of actions by governments, international partners and WHO, included in the WHO global action plan – including raising tobacco taxes.


For more information, contact:

Helena Humphrey
WHO Department of Communications
Telephone: +41 22 791 39 10
Mobile: +41 79 514 15 26
Email: humphreyh@who.int

Fadéla Chaib
WHO Department of Communications
Mobile: +41 79 475 55 56
Telephone: +41 22 791 32 28
Email: chaibf@who.int